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Can J Psychiatry. 2003 Nov;48(10):681-8.

Psychiatric distress among road rage victims and perpetrators.

Author information

1
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, 33 Russell Street, Toronto, ON M5S 2S1. Reg_Smart@camh.net

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the relation between psychiatric distress and road rage, paying particular attention to the potential link between psychiatric illness and frequent involvement in serious forms of road rage.

METHOD:

This study reports data on road rage involvement, demographic characteristics, and mental health for a representative sample of 2610 adults in Ontario. The mental health indicator was the 12-item General Health Questionnaire.

RESULTS:

A cluster analysis revealed 5 distinct groups of people affected by road rage. The most serious offenders (referred to hereafter as the hard core road rage group), representing 5.5% of those affected, exhibited frequent involvement in the most severe forms of road rage and were the most likely (27.5%) to report psychiatric distress.

CONCLUSIONS:

Road rage, particularly experiences of victimization, is related to psychiatric distress. Evidence of psychiatric distress was highest among hard core road rage perpetrators, individuals noted for frequent involvement in serious aggressive and violent conduct. Further research is needed on violence and road rage and its link to mental health.

PMID:
14674051
DOI:
10.1177/070674370304801007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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