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Obstet Gynecol. 2003 Nov;102(5 Pt 1):934-9.

Lower quality of life among women with chronic pelvic pain after pelvic inflammatory disease.

Author information

1
University of Pittsburgh, Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261, USA. clcst10@pitt.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the morbidity from chronic pelvic pain after pelvic inflammatory disease (PID).

METHODS:

A total of 547 women were studied as part of the PID Evaluation and Clinical Health (PEACH) Study. Chronic pelvic pain was defined as pelvic pain reported at two or more consecutive interviews conducted every 3 to 4 months through 32 months and was graded as mild to moderate (low pain intensity) or moderate to severe (high pain intensity). Mean Medical Outcomes Study Short Form (SF-36) scores at 32 months were compared by chronic pelvic pain categories.

RESULTS:

The mean (+/- standard deviation) physical health composite scores and mental health composite scores from the SF-36 were progressively lower among women with increasing grade of chronic pelvic pain (physical health composite scores: no chronic pelvic pain = 87.3 +/- 10.7, mild to moderate chronic pelvic pain = 79.1 +/- 14.6, moderate to severe chronic pelvic pain = 73.6 +/- 16.0, P < .01; mental health composite scores: no chronic pelvic pain = 78.7 +/- 13.6, mild to moderate chronic pelvic pain = 69.1 +/- 15.8, moderate to severe chronic pelvic pain = 67.5 +/- 17.1, P < or = .01). Individual physical function, bodily pain, general health, vitality, social function, and mental health scores were also significantly lower among women with chronic pelvic pain and by increasing grade of pain intensity.

CONCLUSION:

Chronic pelvic pain after PID is associated with reduced physical and mental health.

PMID:
14672466
DOI:
10.1016/s0029-7844(03)00695-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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