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Fertil Steril. 2003 Dec;80(6):1488-94.

Uterine fibroids and gynecologic pain symptoms in a population-based study.

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1
School of Public Health, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720-7360, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the association between dyspareunia, dysmenorrhea, and noncyclic pelvic pain and the presence and characteristics of uterine fibroids.

DESIGN:

Population-based cross-sectional study.

SETTING:

Desio, Italy.

PATIENT(S):

Six hundred thirty-five non-care-seeking participants of the Seveso Women's Health Study with an intact uterus who underwent transvaginal ultrasound.

INTERVENTION(S):

None.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

Ultrasound-detected presence of uterine fibroids and fibroid characteristics including volume, number, location, and position. Current dyspareunia, dysmenorrhea, and noncyclic pelvic pain was measured by self-report on a visual analog scale.

RESULT(S):

Uterine fibroids were detected in 96 women (15%). Women with fibroids were more likely to report moderate or severe dyspareunia (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 2.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.9-8.3, statistically significant trend) and moderate or severe noncyclic pelvic pain (adjusted OR = 2.6, 95% CI = 0.9-7.6, statistically significant trend) than women without fibroids. Moderate or severe dysmenorrhea was not associated with the presence of fibroids (adjusted OR = 1.1, 95% CI = 0.5-2.6). Number and total volume of fibroids were not related to pain.

CONCLUSION(S):

This is the first population-based study of gynecologic pain symptoms and fibroids. Dyspareunia and noncyclic pelvic pain, but not dysmenorrhea, increased in severity with the presence of uterine fibroids. Fibroid-associated pain symptomatology in a non-care-seeking population may be different from that of a clinic population.

PMID:
14667888
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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