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Aesthetic Plast Surg. 2003 Sep-Oct;27(5):411-7. Epub 2003 Dec 4.

Improved scar quality following primary and secondary healing of cutaneous wounds.

Author information

1
American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon. aata@torra.net.lb

Abstract

Poor wound healing remains a critical problem in our daily practice of surgery, exerting a heavy toll on our patients as well as on the health care system. In susceptible individuals, scars can become raised, reddish, and rigid, may cause itching and pain, and might even lead to serious cosmetic and functional problems. Hypertrophic scars do not occur spontaneously in animals, which explains the lack of experimental models for the study of pathologic scar modulation. We present the results of three clinical comparative prospective studies that we have conducted. In the first study, secondary healing and cosmetic appearance following healing of partial thickness skin graft donor sites under dry (semi-open Sofra-Tulle dressing) and moist (moist exposed burn ointment, MEBO) was assessed. In the second study, healing of the donor sites was evaluated following treatment with Tegaderm or MEBO, two different types of moisture-retentive dressings. In the third study, 3 comparable groups of primarily healed wounds were evaluated. One group was treated by topical antibiotic ointment, the second group was treated by Moist Exposed Burn Ointment (MEBO), and the third group did not receive any topical treatment. In the second study, secondary healing of partial thickness skin graft donor sites was evaluated following treatment with Tegaderm or MEBO, two different types of moisture-retentive dressings. In the second and third studies, healed wounds were evaluated with the quantitative scale for scar assessment described by Beausang et al. Statistical analysis revealed that for both types of wound healing, scar quality was significantly superior in those wounds treated with MEBO.

PMID:
14648065
DOI:
10.1007/s00266-003-3049-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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