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Neurology. 2003 Nov 25;61(10):1351-6.

The influence of diabetes and hyperglycemia on clinical course after intracerebral hemorrhage.

Author information

1
Department of Neurosciences, Neurology Unit, University of Siena, Italy. passero@unisi.it

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether diabetes and admission hyperglycemia in nondiabetic patients influence outcome and the occurrence of cerebral and medical complications after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH).

METHODS:

The study sample included 764 patients with ICH. The effects of diabetes and admission hyperglycemia were examined in relation to 30-day and 3-month mortality using Cox regression models controlling for potential confounders. The analysis was conducted for the entire sample of patients and repeated in comatose and noncomatose patients.

RESULTS:

Among comatose patients, neither diabetes nor admission hyperglycemia contributed significant predictive information, as nearly all patients died. In noncomatose patients, diabetes was an independent predictor of 30-day (odds ratio [OR] 1.31; 95% CI 1.08 to 1.58) and 3-month (OR 1.30; 95% CI 1.08 to 1.56) mortality and was associated with a greater incidence of infectious (OR 1.24; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.49) and cerebral (OR 1.42; 95% CI 1.10 to 1.83) complications. Among nondiabetic patients with Glasgow Coma Scale score of >8, hyperglycemia was an independent predictor of 30-day (OR 1.29; 95% CI 1.05 to 1.58) and 3-month (OR 1.27; 95% CI 1.05 to 1.53) mortality and was associated with a greater incidence of cerebral complications (OR 1.47; 95% CI 1.12 to 2.94).

CONCLUSIONS:

Both diabetes and admission hyperglycemia in nondiabetic patients are predictors of poor outcome after supratentorial ICH. This may be related to the greater incidence of cerebral and infectious complications in diabetic patients and of cerebral complications in hyperglycemic nondiabetic patients.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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