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Diabetes Care. 2003 Dec;26(12):3219-25.

Adiponectin in a native Canadian population experiencing rapid epidemiological transition.

Author information

1
Leadership Sinai Centre for Diabetes, Mt. Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. hanley@mshri.on.ca

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Adiponectin is emerging as an important protein in the etiology of obesity and related metabolic disorders. The objectives of this study were to determine cross-sectional and prospective associations of adiponectin concentration with adiposity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in a population-based study of Native Canadians, a group experiencing dramatic increases in diabetes and CVD.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

During the 1993-1995 baseline survey, samples for glucose, insulin, adiponectin, and lipids were collected after an overnight fast. Waist circumference and percent body fat were measured, and a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test was administered: n = 505 with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), 74 with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and 149 with diabetes. In 1998, 95 high-risk subjects, defined as those who, at baseline, had either IGT or NGT with an elevated 2-h glucose concentration (>/==" BORDER="0">7.0 mmol/l), participated in a follow-up examination using the protocol used at baseline.

RESULTS:

After adjustment for covariates including percent body fat and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), adiponectin concentrations were significantly lower among men versus women (10.8 vs. 15.0 micro g/ml, P < 0.0001) and among diabetic versus NGT subjects (11.1 vs. 13.1 micro g/ml, P < 0.05). Adiponectin was inversely correlated with percent body fat, waist circumference, HOMA-IR, and triglyceride and positively correlated with HDL (r = |0.30|-|0.44|, all P < 0.0001). In multivariate linear regression analysis in nondiabetic subjects, HDL and percent body fat were significantly related to adiponectin variation among both men and women (R(2) = 28-29%). Factor analysis returned three underlying factors among these variables, with adiponectin loading on the second factor along with insulin, waist circumference, triglyceride, and HDL. In the follow-up study, higher adiponectin at baseline was significantly associated with increases in HDL (r = 0.24, P = 0.03) and decreases in HOMA-IR (r = -0.29, P = 0.009) after adjustment for covariates, including age, adiposity, and diabetes status at baseline and follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS:

These population-based findings support the hypothesis that low circulating levels of adiponectin are an important determinant of risk of CVD.

PMID:
14633805
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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