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Crim Behav Ment Health. 2003;13(1):31-44.

Alcohol and violence and the possible role of serotonin.

Author information

  • 1Biomedical Research Laboratory, Whitchurch Hospital, Cardiff, CF14 7XB, Wales, UK. abdulla.badawy@cardiffandvale.wales.nhs.uk

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There is undisputed evidence linking alcohol consumption and violence and other forms of aggressive behaviour, and also linking aggression with dysfunction of the brain indolylamine serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine or 5-HT). Alcohol consumption also causes major disturbances in the metabolism of brain serotonin. In particular, acute alcohol intake depletes brain serotonin levels in normal (non-alcohol-dependent) subjects. On the basis of the above statements, it is suggested that, at the biological level, alcohol may induce aggressive behaviour in susceptible individuals, at least in part, by inducing a strong depletion of brain serotonin levels.

AIMS:

In this article, evidence supporting these interrelationships and interactions will be summarized and discussed, the alcohol serotonin aggression hypothesis will be reiterated, and potential intervention strategies will be proposed.

PMID:
14624270
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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