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Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2003 Jul;2(2):141-9.

Patients' perspectives on statin therapy for treatment of hypercholesterolaemia: a qualitative study.

Author information

1
Nursing and Midwifery School, University of Glasgow, 59 Oakfield Avenue, G12 8SW, Glasgow, Scotland, UK. e.p.tolmie@clinmed.gla.ac.uk

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Health Care Practitioners' attempts to implement secondary prevention targets for coronary heart disease (CHD) may be restricted by low rates of persistence with statin therapy. There is a need to understand why some patients, despite having established CHD and elevated cholesterol, do not comply with their prescribed statin regimen.

AIM:

To explore patients' perspectives on compliance with statin therapy.

SETTING:

Primary care, West of Scotland.

METHODS:

The research approach was qualitative. Thirty-three patients prescribed statin therapy and identified as having different patterns of compliance (poor moderate and good) were interviewed. The in-depth interviews were conducted on a one to one basis. Patients prescribed statin therapy for less than three months were excluded. Data were analysed thematically with the assistance of QSR Nudist.

FINDINGS:

From analysis of the narrative data, two broad categories, i.e. 'Patient-health care provider communication' and 'Health beliefs' were identified. These categories encompassed six main themes: 'Initiation of therapy'; 'Subsequent feedback'; 'Sources of misconceptions'; 'Unconditional acceptance'; 'Conditional acceptance'; 'Deferment and Rejection'. Acceptance of and compliance with statin therapy appeared to be associated with the provision, interpretation and feedback of information during patient-practitioner consultations, and patients' beliefs about personal health status, cholesterol, and recommended cholesterol-lowering strategies.

CONCLUSIONS:

Patients' beliefs and understanding about cholesterol, and the role of cholesterol modifying strategies should be determined prior to the initiation of therapy and at appropriate intervals thereafter.

PMID:
14622639
DOI:
10.1016/S1474-5151(03)00028-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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