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Acta Gastroenterol Belg. 2003 Jul-Sep;66(3):199-205.

A prospective comparative study of push and wireless-capsule enteroscopy in patients with obscure digestive bleeding.

Author information

1
Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatopancreatology, Hôpital Erasme, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Route de Lennik, 808, B-1070 Brussels, Belgium. Andre.Van.Gossum@ulb.ac.be

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To prospectively compare the global and specific diagnostic yields of push and wireless videocapsule enteroscopy for small bowel lesions in patients with obscure digestive bleeding after esogastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy.

METHODS:

The patients studied had unexplained chronic iron-deficient anemia or digestive blood loss after routine investigations. Small bowel investigation was performed first with the wireless-capsule (M2A, Given Imaging) and then with the push-enteroscope (Olympus SIF100).

RESULTS:

Twenty-one patients were included in the protocol (14 females and 7 males), whose mean age was 60 years (range: 18 to 81). All patients had iron-deficient anemia with occult bleeding (n = 16) or overt bleeding (n = 5). A digestive lesion was observed in 14 of 21 cases (66%). Lesions were: esophageal varices (n = 2), reflux esophagitis (n = 1), upper gastrointestinal tract ulcerations (n = 9), intestinal angioectasia (n = 4), ileal varices (n = 1), cecal angioectasia (n = 1) and tumor-like angioma in the jejunum (n = 1). These 19 lesions were discovered by both methods in 10 cases (52%), by push-enteroscopy only in 6 (31%) and by wireless-capsule endoscopy only in 3 (17%). The global diagnostic yield was therefore slightly but not significantly higher for push wireless-capsule enteroscopy (61 vs 52%; NS) and the specific diagnostic yield was similar (20%). Interobserver agreement on the wireless-capsule recordings reached 85% for detection of findings.

CONCLUSIONS:

In patients with obscure digestive bleeding, no significant difference in diagnostic yield was evidenced between push and wireless-capsule endoscopy. The main advantage of the latter method versus the former was the detection of distal lesions in the small bowel. Wireless-capsule enteroscopy is mandatory for patients with active unexplained bleeding and negative push-enteroscopy, or for defining the extension of a disease involving, for instance, the presence of angioectasia.

PMID:
14618949
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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