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Anal Chem. 2003 Nov 15;75(22):6209-17.

High sequence coverage of proteins isolated from liquid separations of breast cancer cells using capillary electrophoresis-time-of-flight MS and MALDI-TOF MS mapping.

Author information

1
Department of Chemistry, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1055, USA.

Abstract

A method has been developed for high sequence coverage analysis of proteins isolated from breast cancer cell lines. Intact proteins are isolated using multidimensional liquid-phase separations that permit the collection of individual protein fractions. Protein digests are then analyzed by both matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) peptide mass fingerprinting and by capillary electrophoresis-electrospray ionization (CE-ESI)-TOF MS peptide mapping. These methods can be readily interfaced to the relatively clean proteins resulting from liquid-phase fractionation of cell lysates with little sample preparation. Using combined sequence information provided by both mapping methods, 100% sequence coverage is often obtained for smaller proteins, while for larger proteins up to 75 kDa, over 90% coverage can be obtained. Furthermore, an accurate intact protein MW value (within 150 ppm) can be obtained from ESI-TOF MS. The intact MW together with high coverage sequence information provides accurate identification. More notably the high sequence coverage of CE-ESI-TOF MS together with the MS/MS information provided by the ion trap/reTOF MS elucidates posttranslational modifications, sequence changes, truncations, and isoforms that may otherwise go undetected when standard MALDI-MS peptide fingerprinting is used. This capability is critical in the analysis of human cancer cells where large numbers of expressed proteins are modified, and these modifications may play an important role in the cancer process.

PMID:
14616003
DOI:
10.1021/ac0346454
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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