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Clin Infect Dis. 2003 Dec 1;37(11):1481-9. Epub 2003 Nov 7.

Clinical presentation and bacteriologic analysis of infected human bites in patients presenting to emergency departments.

Author information

1
Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Medicine, Olive View-University of California at Los Angeles Medical Center, Sylmar, California 91342, USA. idnet@ucla.edu

Abstract

Previous studies of infected human bites have been limited by small numbers of patients and suboptimal microbiologic methodology. We conducted a multicenter prospective study of 50 patients with infected human bites. Seventy percent of the patients and assailants were young adult men. Fifty-six percent of injuries were clenched-fist injuries and 44% were occlusional bites. Most injuries were to the hands. Fifty-four percent of patients were hospitalized. The median number of isolates per wound culture was 4 (3 aerobes and 1 anaerobe); aerobes and anaerobes were isolated from 54% of wounds, aerobes alone were isolated from 44%, and anaerobes alone were isolated from 2%. Isolates included Streptococcus anginosus (52%), Staphylococcus aureus (30%), Eikenella corrodens (30%), Fusobacterium nucleatum (32%), and Prevotella melaninogenica (22%). Candida species were found in 8%. Fusobacterium, Peptostreptococcus, and Candida species were isolated more frequently from occlusional bites than from clenched-fist injuries. Many strains of Prevotella and S. aureus were beta-lactamase producers. Amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and moxifloxacin demonstrated excellent in vitro activity against common isolates.

PMID:
14614671
DOI:
10.1086/379331
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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