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Br J Cancer. 2003 Nov 17;89(10):1909-13.

Caveolin-1 overexpression predicts poor disease-free survival of patients with clinically confined renal cell carcinoma.

Author information

1
Pharmaceutical Cell Biology, Welsh School of Pharmacy, Cardiff University, Cardiff, CF10 3XF, UK.

Abstract

Renal cell carcinomas, although usually apparently fully resected at surgery, commonly recur as distant metastasis. New markers are needed to predict which patients may relapse especially as novel methods of treatment (e.g. laproscopic resection) may make it impossible to assess conventional pathological prognostic markers. The caveolins are a family of proteins that represent the major structural components of caveolae; recent work suggests that these may have influence on several signalling pathways and they are thus potential prognostic markers. Immunohistochemistry for caveolin-1 was performed on sections of peripheral tumour from 114 consecutative nonmetastatic RCCs. Cytoplasmic caveolin-1 immunohistochemical (ICC) reaction was scored on a semiquantative scale of 1-3. Immunohistochemical score was tested for impact on disease-free survival by Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression methods. A total of 50 tumours had ICC score 1; 43 had score 2 and 21 score 3. Larger, higher grade and tumours with vascular invasion had significantly higher scores. On univariate survival analysis (Kaplan-Meier), patients with tumours scoring 1 had a mean disease-free survival of 6.61 years (95% CI 5.76-7.46) compared with 5.4 years (4.53-6.30) and 3.15 years (1.87-4.44) for scores 2 and 3, respectively. This is a significant difference (P=0.0017 log rank test). On multivariate analysis with size, grade and caveolin ICC score as independent covariates, caveolin ICC score 3 was an influential predictor of poor disease-free survival with a hazard ratio of 2.6 (P=0.03). We conclude that cytoplasmic overexpression of caveolin-1 predicts a poor prognosis in RCC; that this is likely to be a useful prognostic marker and that it may have importance in tumour progression.

PMID:
14612902
PMCID:
PMC2394459
DOI:
10.1038/sj.bjc.6601359
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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