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Virus Res. 2003 Dec;98(1):45-56.

Intraperitoneal dissemination of Ad12-induced undifferentiated neuroectodermal hamster tumors: de novo methylation and transcription patterns of integrated viral and of cellular genes.

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1
Institute for Genetics, University of Cologne, Köln D-50931, Germany.

Abstract

The intramuscular (i.m.) injection of human adenovirus type 12 (Ad12) into newborn Syrian hamsters caused widespread dissemination of up to 15 tumors over the entire peritoneal cavity in 70-90% of the animals within 30-50 days. Subcutaneous (s.c.) injections led to local tumor formation only. Independent of location, tumor histology revealed Homer-Wright rosette-like structures typical for primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET). All tumor cells showed markers indicative of neuroectodermal and mesenchymal derivations. Each Ad12-induced tumor cell carried multiple copies of integrated Ad12 genomes at one chromosomal site which was different for each tumor. For Ad12 tumor induction in hamsters, the patterns of Ad12 viral and cellular gene expression were important and were affected by changes in DNA methylation, both in the integrated Ad12 DNA and the cellular genome. By applying the bisulfite protocol, the de novo DNA methylation in the integrated Ad12 genomes was determined. These patterns were complex, characterized by regional initiation and by excluding genome segments in the E1A and E1B promoters. In all tumors, the Ad12 segments E1A, E1B, E2A, parts of E3 and E4 were similarly transcribed, as shown by the RT-PCR and DNA microarray methods. Changes in the transcription of a large number of cellular genes was assessed by using mouse gene microarrays encompassing about 1980 different mouse genes with 87-96% homology to hamster genes. Similarities and differences existed in the transcription of cellular genes of different functional classes among the different Ad12-induced tumors. These alterations in cellular gene transcription may be an important parameter in the oncogenic transformation by Ad12.

PMID:
14609629
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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