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Chest. 2003 Nov;124(5):1702-8.

Comparison of home oximetry monitoring with laboratory polysomnography in children.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. val.kirk@calgaryhealthregion.ca

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES:

To measure the accuracy and reliability of a portable home oximetry monitor with an automated analysis for the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children.

DESIGN:

Prospective cohort study.

SETTING:

Alberta Lung Association Sleep Center, Alberta Children's Hospital Sleep Clinic.

STUDY SUBJECTS:

Consecutive, otherwise healthy children, aged 4 to 18 years, presenting to the Pediatric Sleep Service at the Alberta Children's Hospital for assessment of possible OSA.

INTERVENTIONS:

All subjects underwent 2 nights of monitoring in the home with an oximetry-based portable monitor with an automatic internal scoring algorithm. A third night of monitoring was done simultaneously with computerized laboratory polysomnography according to American Thoracic Society guidelines.

MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS:

Both test-retest reliability of the portable monitor-based desaturation index (DI) between 2 nights at home and between laboratory and home were high using the Bland and Altman analysis (mean agreement, 0.32 and 0.64; limits of agreement, - 8.00 to 8.64 and - 0.75 to 6.50, respectively). The polysomnographic apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) agreed poorly with the portable monitor DI (mean difference, 1.27; limits of agreement, - 12.02 to 15.02). The sensitivity and specificity of the monitor for the identification of moderate sleep apnea (polysomnography AHI > 5/h) were 67% and 60%, respectively.

CONCLUSION:

Portable monitoring based only on oximetry alone is not adequate for the identification of OSA in otherwise healthy children.

PMID:
14605038
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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