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Neuropsychology. 2003 Oct;17(4):539-47.

Long-term memory deficits in schizophrenia: primary or secondary dysfunction?

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands. e.a.e.holthausen@med.rug.nl

Abstract

Long-term memory impairment is often found in schizophrenia. The question remains whether this is caused by other cognitive deficits. One hundred eighteen first-episode patients were compared with 45 control participants on several memory tasks. The role of processing speed and central executive functions on memory performance was examined with regression analysis for all participants and for patients separately. Deficits were found in general verbal learning performance and retrieval in episodic memory and semantic memory. Processing speed reduced disease-related variance in all memory variables. Coordination, organization of information, and speed of processing were the best predictors for long-term memory deficits in patients. The amount of explained variance, however, is small, especially in general verbal learning performance.

PMID:
14599267
DOI:
10.1037/0894-4105.17.4.539
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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