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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2003 Oct;189(4):1120-7.

Ovarian cancer: changes in patterns at diagnosis and relative survival over the last three decades.

Author information

1
Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Wayne State University School of Medicine and Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, Michigan 48201, USA. jbsloan@med.wayne.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study was to examine patterns of diagnosis and relative survival in women who had a diagnosis of primary invasive epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) from 1973 to 1997, with follow-up through the end of 1999.

STUDY DESIGN:

From the population-based Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program, 32,845 women diagnosed between 1973 and 1997 were used for analysis. The study population was divided in three cohorts based on year of diagnosis and the cohorts were compared with respect to variables of interest by using chi(2) tests and relative survival analysis by the life table method.

RESULTS:

There was an increase in the proportions of minorities diagnosed with EOC, of women 60 years or older at diagnosis, and of women undergoing surgery over time. Survival continuously improved over time, although older patients (60 years or older) and African Americans continued to have the poorest survival.

CONCLUSION:

Over time, relative survival of women who had primary invasive EOC diagnosed improved.

PMID:
14586365
DOI:
10.1067/s0002-9378(03)00579-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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