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J Prosthet Dent. 2003 Nov;90(5):465-73.

The influence of the veneering porcelain and different surface treatments on the biaxial flexural strength of a heat-pressed ceramic.

Author information

1
Department of Dental Material Science, ACTA Netherlands, Amsterdam. g.isgro@acta.nl

Abstract

STATEMENT OF PROBLEM:

The strength of all-ceramic restorations can be adversely affected by surface defects, leading to restoration failures. Additionally, when a 2-layer all-ceramic restoration is required for esthetic purposes, part of the stronger ceramic core material is replaced by veneering porcelain.

PURPOSE:

This study evaluated the effect of different surface treatments on the strength of a ceramic core material and veneering porcelain, as well as the influence of veneering porcelain on the strength of a 2-layer ceramic structure.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

Fifty heat-pressed ceramic cores and 30 veneering porcelain discs (17 mm diameter x 2 mm) were made. From the ceramic core group, 20 discs were selected and reduced to a thickness of 1 mm and veneered with 1 mm of porcelain. These specimens were divided into 2 groups of 10 each. The remaining 30 ceramic core and the 30 veneering porcelain discs were divided into 2 sets of 3 equal sized groups (n=10). Ceramic core groups were prepared for testing having the following surfaces: airborne-particle abrasion, ground, and overglazed. Veneering porcelain groups were tested: as fired (no additional treatment), ground, and overglazed. Biaxial flexural strength was measured using the ball-on-ring test method. All specimens were loaded to fracture. One and 2-way analysis of variance were used to analyze the data (alpha=.05).

RESULTS:

The ceramic core discs were significantly (P=.001) stronger than the veneering porcelain discs for the airborne-particle abrasion, as-fired, and ground surface treatments (82 +/- 11 MPa vs 51 +/- 8 MPa and 93 +/- 14 MPa vs 60 +/- 6 MPa, respectively). For the overglazed treatment, there was not a significant difference between the core (115 +/- 1 4 MPa) and the veneer materials (107 +/- 14 MPa). The ground 1-layer core was significantly (P=.015) stronger (93 +/- 14 MPa) than the 2-layer with the core tested in tension (72 +/- 19 MPa). There was no significant difference between 1-layer veneer overglazed (107 +/- 14 MPa) and 2-layer discs when tested with the veneer in tension (105 +/- 16 MPa).

CONCLUSION:

The overglazed surface treatment significantly improved the strength of the materials tested, as well as the strength of 2-layer discs with the veneer in tension. The veneering porcelain influenced the strength of 2-layer specimens only when tested with the ground ceramic core surface in tension.

PMID:
14586311
DOI:
10.1016/j.prosdent.2003.08.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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