Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Pediatr. 2003 Oct;143(4):434-7.

25-hydroxyvitamin D levels among healthy children in Alaska.

Author information

1
Alaska Division of Public Health, PO Box 240249, 3601 C Street, Anchorage, AK 99524, USA. Brad_Gessner@health.state.ak.us

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine vitamin D levels among children 6 to 23 months old receiving services from Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) programs in Alaska. Study design During 2001 and 2002, we recruited 133 children receiving services at seven WIC clinics, administered a risk factor questionnaire, and collected blood.

RESULTS:

Fifteen (11%) and 26 (20%) children, respectively, had vitamin D levels <15 (considered abnormal) and 15 to <25 ng/mL (low normal). Compared with other children, children who still breast-fed were more likely to have a vitamin D level <15 ng/mL (relative risk [RR], 12; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.6-39) or 15 to <25 ng/mL (RR, 3.6; 95% CI, 1.9-6.8) than > or =25 ng/mL. Among 41 still breast-feeding children, 14 (34%) took supplemental vitamins, and six (18%) were reported to have received vitamins every day.

CONCLUSIONS:

Vitamin D deficiency is prevalent in Alaska. Breast-feeding in the absence of adequate vitamin D supplementation is the greatest risk factor.

PMID:
14571215
DOI:
10.1067/S0022-3476(03)00410-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center