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Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2003 Oct;124(4):373-8.

Factors associated with the stability of titanium screws placed in the posterior region for orthodontic anchorage.

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1
Department of Orthodontics, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine and Dentistry, Japan.

Abstract

Recently, implant anchors such as titanium screws have been used for absolute anchorage during edgewise treatment. However, there have been few human studies reporting on the stability of implant anchors placed in the posterior region. The purpose of this study was to examine the success rates and to find the factors associated with the stability of titanium screws placed into the buccal alveolar bone of the posterior region. Fifty-one patients with malocclusions, 134 titanium screws of 3 types, and 17 miniplates were retrospectively examined in relation to clinical characteristics. The 1-year success rate of screws with 1.0-mm diameter was significantly less than that of other screws with 1.5-mm or 2.3-mm diameter or than that of miniplates. Flap surgery was associated with the patient's discomfort. A high mandibular plane angle and inflammation of peri-implant tissue after implantation were risk factors for mobility of screws. However, we could not detect a significant association between the success rate and the following variables: screw length, kind of placement surgery, immediate loading, location of implantation, age, gender, crowding of teeth, anteroposterior jaw base relationship, controlled periodontitis, and temporomandibular disorder symptoms. We concluded that the diameter of a screw of 1.0 mm or less, inflammation of the peri-implant tissue, and a high mandibular plane angle (ie, thin cortical bone), were associated with the mobility (ie, failure) of the titanium screw placed into the buccal alveolar bone of the posterior region for orthodontic anchorage.

PMID:
14560266
DOI:
10.1016/s0889-5406(03)00565-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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