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Am J Cardiol. 2003 Oct 15;92(8):947-50.

Radiofrequency catheter ablation of septal accessory pathways in the pediatric age group.

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1
Department of Cardiology, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

Abstract

Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RCA) of septal accessory pathways may be technically challenging in children due to the risk of inadvertent atrioventricular (AV) block in the setting of small cardiac dimensions. Outcomes were reviewed for all patients aged < or =19 years with manifest and concealed septal accessory pathways undergoing RCA since 1990 at a single institution. One hundred forty-five procedures were performed in 127 patients (mean age 11.6 years). The number of studies according to accessory pathway location were: anteroseptal (n = 36), midseptal (n = 20), mouth of coronary sinus (n = 40), middle cardiac vein (n = 6), right posteroseptal (n = 21), and left posteroseptal (n = 22). Ablation was deferred for 9 patients (6 anteroseptal and 3 midseptal) in favor of additional pharmacologic trials. Acute success rates for targeted accessory pathways were: anteroseptal (96%), midseptal (94%), mouth of coronary sinus (88%), middle cardiac vein (100%), right posteroseptal (100%), and left posteroseptal (96%). Recurrence rates during follow-up were: anteroseptal (14%), midseptal (12%), mouth of coronary sinus (3%), right posteroseptal (4%), and left posteroseptal (4%). Permanent second or third degree AV block occurred in 4 of 136 RCA attempts (3%), involving 2 anteroseptal and 2 midseptal pathways. In 3 of these 4 cases, a high probability of block was anticipated from prior ablation efforts, prompting pacemaker insertion before or in conjunction with RCA. Thus, in the pediatric age group, acute RCA success rates for septal accessory pathways can exceed 90%. The risks of AV block and accessory pathway recurrence are most relevant to anteroseptal and midseptal pathways. These data may be factored into patient selection and the decision whether to ablate.

PMID:
14556871
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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