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Int J Artif Organs. 2003 Aug;26(8):753-7.

Hemofiltration during cardiopulmonary bypass for high risk adult cardiac surgery.

Author information

1
The Department of Cardiac Surgery, Austin & Repatriation Medical Centre, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.

Abstract

AIMS:

The role of hemofiltration (HF) during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in adult cardiac surgery is controversial. It may be beneficial during prolonged CPB in high-risk surgery. Accordingly, we sought to compare two groups of patients undergoing high-risk cardiac surgery with or without HF.

METHODS:

One hundred and eighteen patients who underwent complex cardiac surgical procedures during a 12-month period were divided into two groups. Group I (n=61) comprised patients who were treated with hemofiltration during CPB. Group II (n=57) were not filtered. Estimated risk of death, standard demographic, clinical and surgical features were obtained and predetermined outcomes were studied. Statistical comparisons were made.

RESULTS:

Age, procedure times and mortality rates were similar in both groups. The mean volume of fluid removed in group I was 3.4 L. The preoperative mean Parsonnet score was 24.8 in group I and 22.5 in group II (ns). Postoperative serum hemoglobin, hematocrit, platelet, and albumin levels were all significantly higher in group I patients (p=0.0015) indicating hemoconcentration. Post-operative chest drainage showed a trend toward decreased post-operative bleeding in group I (p=0.065). Postoperative pleural effusions requiring chest tube drainage were significantly less in group I (9.8% vs. 29.8% 6; p = 0.0062). The incidence of lung infection was also decreased from 26.3% to 13.1% (p=0.05). Operative mortality was similar in both groups (11.4% in group 1, 10.5% in group II, ns).

CONCLUSION:

Hemofiltration during CPB attenuates postoperative anemia, thrombocytopenia and hypoalbuminemia, may reduce post-operative bleeding and appears to decrease post-operative pulmonary complications.

PMID:
14521173
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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