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Eur J Appl Physiol. 2004 Jan;91(1):46-52. Epub 2003 Sep 24.

The relationship between maximal jump-squat power and sprint acceleration in athletes.

Author information

1
Faculty of Kinesiology, The University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB, E3B 5A3, Canada. sleivert@unb.ca

Abstract

This study investigated the relationship between sprint start performance (5-m time) and strength and power variables. Thirty male athletes [height: 183.8 (6.8) cm, and mass: 90.6 (9.3) kg; mean (SD)] each completed six 10-m sprints from a standing start. Sprint times were recorded using a tethered running system and the force-time characteristics of the first ground contact were recorded using a recessed force plate. Three to six days later subjects completed three concentric jump squats, using a traditional and split technique, at a range of external loads from 30-70% of one repetition maximum (1RM). Mean (SD) braking impulse during acceleration was negligible [0.009 (0.007) N/s/kg) and showed no relationship with 5 m time; however, propulsive impulse was substantial [0.928 (0.102) N/s/kg] and significantly related to 5-m time ( r=-0.64, P<0.001). Average and peak power were similar during the split squat [7.32 (1.34) and 17.10 (3.15) W/kg] and the traditional squat [7.07 (1.25) and 17.58 (2.85) W/kg], and both were significantly related to 5-m time ( r=-0.64 to -0.68, P<0.001). Average power was maximal at all loads between 30% and 60% of 1RM for both squats. Split squat peak power was also maximal between 30% and 60% of 1RM; however, traditional squat peak power was maximal between 50% and 70% of 1RM. Concentric force development is critical to sprint start performance and accordingly maximal concentric jump power is related to sprint acceleration.

PMID:
14508691
DOI:
10.1007/s00421-003-0941-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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