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Otol Neurotol. 2003 Sep;24(5):757-63.

Second oral language capabilities in children with cochlear implants.

Author information

1
New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA. susan.waltzman@med.nyu.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The development of oral language in children with a cochlear implant is dependent on numerous factors. Although baseline achievements have been established, ceiling attainment levels have yet to be explored. One indicator of a higher capability level is the ability of children with implants to learn to communicate orally using a second language. The purpose of this research was to explore 1) the feasibility of children with cochlear implants developing oral fluency in a second language and 2) the factors that affect the development.

STUDY DESIGN:

Retrospective study of children fulfilling the criteria.

SETTING:

University medical center.

PATIENTS:

Eighteen profoundly hearing-impaired children who were reported to be bilingual.

INTERVENTION:

Cochlear implantation at age 5 or younger.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

The subjects were evaluated using standard speech perception and receptive and expressive language measures.

RESULTS:

The data revealed the ability of some pediatric cochlear implant recipients to develop competency in a second spoken language in addition to their primary language. Equally as important is the fact that the majority showed age-appropriate receptive and/or expressive language abilities in their primary language commensurate with normal-hearing children.

CONCLUSION:

High levels of achievement including the learning of a second spoken language are possible after implantation in the pediatric population. Variables include speech perception postimplantation, the linguistic environment, type of intervention, and educational placement.

PMID:
14501453
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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