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Neuroscience. 1992 Aug;49(4):771-80.

Transient lesion-induced increase of basic fibroblast growth factor and its receptor in layer VIb (subplate cells) of the adult rat cerebral cortex.

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1
Department of Psychobiology, University of California, Irvine 92717.

Abstract

Basic fibroblast growth factor is a potent trophic factor with a wide spectrum of activity at various stages of neuronal development. In our studies on the effects of select lesions on the expression of growth factors, we observed that neurons of layer VIb of the rat cerebral cortex developed immunoreactivity for basic fibroblast growth factor and its receptor following injury. Recent evidence indicates that layer VIb of the rat cerebral cortex contains the subplate cell population, a group of neurons shown to participate in the development of the cerebral cortex. In this article, we examined the nature and time-course of the response to injury of the expression of basic fibroblast growth factor and its receptor in these cells. We used an anti-basic fibroblast growth factor monoclonal antibody that recognizes the active form of basic fibroblast growth factor, and a polyclonal antibody that recognizes the extracellular domain of the basic fibroblast growth factor receptor. The induction of basic fibroblast growth factor and its receptor in layer VIb cells occurred after entorhinal cortex lesion, fimbria-formix transection or aspiration of small segment of the frontoparietal cortex. The lesion-induced effect was transient, appearing by postlesion day 2 and having disappeared by postlesion day 7. These findings suggest that endogenous basic fibroblast growth factor may have a neuroprotective role on layer VIb neurons after trauma and/or may participate in cortical plasticity during adulthood.

PMID:
1436480
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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