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JAMA. 1992 Dec 2;268(21):3092-7.

Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty in New York State. Risk factors and outcomes.

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1
Department of Health Policy and Management, State University of New York, Albany.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To identify significant independent risk factors for major percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty outcomes.

DESIGN:

Retrospective analysis using univariate and logistic regression analysis to identify significant independent risk factors for adverse outcomes.

SETTING:

All 31 hospitals performing percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty in New York State in 1991.

PATIENTS:

All 5827 patients undergoing percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty between January 1, 1991, and June 30, 1991, in New York State.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

In-hospital mortality, major complication(s) (in-hospital mortality, myocardial infarction, and/or emergency coronary artery bypass graft), and absence of angiographic success (stenosis reduction of less than 20% on any attempted lesion or residual stenosis of at least 50% on any attempted lesion).

MAIN RESULTS:

Before discharge from the hospital, a total of 37 patients (0.63%) died; 67 patients (1.1%) suffered a myocardial infarction, with a mortality rate of 4.5%; and 97 patients (1.7%) underwent emergency coronary artery bypass graft surgery, with a mortality rate of 2.1% (no deaths in 85 patients who were hemodynamically stable and two deaths among 12 patients who were hemodynamically unstable). A total of 187 patients (3.2%) experienced a major complication. Angiographic success was achieved for 88% of all patients. Multivariate analysis found four independent preprocedural variables related to death: female gender, hemodynamic instability, shock, and ejection fraction.

CONCLUSIONS:

Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty outcomes in New York compare favorably with other recent results reported in the literature. Several preprocedural variables markedly increase the incidence of adverse events.

PMID:
1433740
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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