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J Am Acad Dermatol. 1992 Nov;27(5 Pt 1):729-36.

Extracorporeal photopheresis for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

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  • 1Division of Dermatology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Many regimens are used for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), but with advanced disease response rates and patient survival are not adequate with any current therapy. Recently extracorporeal photochemotherapy (ECP) was proposed as an alternative therapy.

OBJECTIVE:

Our purpose is to present the results of ECP in patients with CTCL refractory to other treatments.

METHODS:

Patients with CTCL received ECP at 3- to 5-week intervals for at least 6 months. All patients except one were in stage T2 (patch/plaque) or higher. Eight patients had extracutaneous disease involving lymph nodes (six patients), bone marrow (five), or S├ęzary cells (six). The interval between initial symptoms and diagnosis was 5.9 +/- 1.9 years (mean +/- standard error of the mean) and the interval between diagnosis and ECP was 2.2 +/- 0.4 years.

RESULTS:

A complete response (disappearance of all lesions) was obtained in five patients (25%) and a partial response (disappearance of at least 50% of lesions) in six patients (30%). Four patients (20%) showed stabilization of their disease and five progressed (25%). The only variable that predicted responders versus nonresponders was the number of ECP sessions (p < 0.05 by multivariate logistic regression). In contrast, no separate beneficial effect of adjunctive chemotherapy (p > 0.5) or electron beam therapy (p > 0.1) was found.

CONCLUSION:

Long-term ECP may be an effective alternative treatment for CTCL refractory to other therapies and is likely to be even more useful when combined with other modalities.

PMID:
1430395
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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