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Can Med Assoc J. 1964 Sep 5;91:553-7.

STUDIES ON INHIBITION OF INTESTINAL ABSORPTION OF RADIOACTIVE STRONTIUM. II. EFFECTS OF ADMINISTRATION OF SODIUM ALGINATE BY OROGASTRIC INTUBATION AND FEEDING.

Abstract

A method is reported that enables selective suppression of absorption of radioactive strontium from ingested food material, permitting calcium to remain available to the body. Studies were carried out by measuring blood levels and bone uptake of Sr(89) and Ca(45) at different time intervals after orogastric intubation of rats. The addition of sodium alginate, derived from brown marine algae, to the radioactive isotopes increased the overall physiological discrimination against strontium by amounts up to 60% after 24 hours. This discrimination was further increased by feeding sodium alginate mixed with standard diet in the proportions of 20:80 and 30:70. The observed ratio was reduced by administration of sodium alginate from 0.25 to 0.09.Determination of the limiting dosage in rats is restricted to the amounts which rats will consume. In the event of an inadvertent release of radioactive strontium, human subjects probably could increase their intake of alginate at will, permitting a greater effectiveness of sodium alginate than could be obtained in experimental animals.

PMID:
14176062
PMCID:
PMC1927926
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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