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Appl Microbiol. 1964 Jan;12:63-9.

OCCURRENCE OF COLIFORMS, FECAL COLIFORMS, AND STREPTOCOCCI ON VEGETATION AND INSECTS.

Abstract

This study considers the sanitary significance of coliforms, fecal coliforms, and streptococci isolated from 152 species of plants and 40 samples of insects. These specimens were collected from various ecological environments and grouped into several categories. Results indicate that typical coliforms of the warm-blooded animal gut contribute a relatively small percentage of the organisms associated with vegetation (14.1%) and insects, (14.9%). A total of 1,203 coliform strains from vegetation and 1,084 coliform strains from insects were classified as to IMViC type and fecal coliform. No type was predominant in either the vegetation or insect groupings. The biochemical results for 646 streptococci from vegetation and 226 cultures from insects were reported. The predominant group, Streptococcus fecalis, as defined by Sherman criteria, constituted a majority of all strains from vegetation and insects. The "Completed Coliform Test" is recommended for the examination of plant and insect specimens to eliminate the many anaerobic and aerobic sporeforming bacteria that frequently produce false positive reactions by the "Confirmed Test" procedure. These findings support the current interpretation of the significance of the fecal coliform test for stream investigations or for surface water quality evaluations.

PMID:
14106942
PMCID:
PMC1058066
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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