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Bull Pan Am Health Organ. 1992;26(3):208-19.

An AIDS-related knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and practices survey among schoolchildren in Barbados.

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1
National Advisory Committee on AIDS, Barbados.

Abstract

A knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and practices (KABP) survey was performed among Barbadian secondary schoolchildren 11-16 years old in January 1990. The survey sought to assess the children's knowledge of AIDS and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission; their attitudes toward people with HIV/AIDS; their sexual practices; and changes needed in education programs seeking to reduce childhood HIV transmission. A pretested self-administered questionnaire was used. The survey sample was derived by selecting every eleventh student on the rosters of all the secondary schools in Barbados. All of the survey respondents completed the questionnaire on the same day, having been assembled examination-style for that purpose. The results showed high levels of correct knowledge about the principal routes of HIV transmission. However, a considerable proportion of the respondents harbored incorrect beliefs regarding mosquito transmission and dangers to blood donors, and many showed uncertainty or incorrect knowledge regarding possible HIV transmission by biting, spitting, or use of public toilets. About a third of the children (51.4% of the boys and 18.7% of the girls) said they had experienced sexual intercourse, though only 20% reported being sexually active in the year preceding the survey. Three-quarters of the sexually experienced group said they knew how to use condoms, but only a third said there was any time when they had used protection during sexual intercourse. Overall, the results indicate that education efforts prior to the survey had been effective, but that reinforcement of such efforts as well as their extension into the primary schools is warranted. Further research directed at helping these efforts to encourage more meaningful changes in sexual behavior is also needed.

PIP:

A knowledge, attitude, beliefs, and practices (KABP) survey was performed among Barbadian secondary schoolchildren ages 11-16 in January 1990. The survey sought to assess the children's knowledge of AIDS and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission; their attitudes towards people with HIV/AIDS; their sexual practices; and changes needed in education programs seeking to reduce childhood HIV transmissions. A pretested self-administered questionnaire was used. The survey sample was derived by selecting every 11th student on the rosters of all secondary school in Barbados. All of the survey respondents completed the questionnaire on the same day, having been assembled examination- style for that purpose. Results showed high levels of correct knowledge concerning the principle routes of HIV transmission; however, a considerable portion of the respondents maintained incorrect beliefs with regard to mosquito transmission and dangers to blood donors, and many demonstrated uncertainty or incorrect knowledge concerning possible HIV transmission by biting, spitting, or use of public toilets. About 1/3 of the children (51.4% of the boys and 18.7% of the girls) said they had experienced sexual intercourse, although only 20% said they were sexually active in the year preceding the survey. 3/4 of the sexually experienced group said they knew how to use condoms, but only 1/3 said there was any time when they had used protection during sexual intercourse. Overall, results indicate that education efforts prior to the survey had been effective, but that reinforcement of such efforts as well as their extension into the primary schools is warranted. Further research directed at aiding in this effort to encourage more meaningful changes in sexual behavior is also necessary.

PMID:
1393193
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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