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J Urol. 1992 Oct;148(4):1215-9; discussion 1219-20.

Impact of radical prostatectomy on the characteristics of bladder and urethra.

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1
Department of Urology, Stanford University Medical Center, California 94305-5118.

Abstract

A prospective study was done to evaluate the long-term effects of radical prostatectomy on the function of the bladder in filling and voiding. Preoperative urodynamic studies were done on 29 patients with a mean age of 62.9 +/- 5.2 years. The preoperative results show that 16 of the 29 patients demonstrated detrusor instability with maximum contractile pressures of 59 +/- 28 cm. water. Followup urodynamic assessment was done in 13 of these patients 22.9 +/- 1.1 months after surgery. Postoperatively, the maximum detrusor instability pressure did not decrease significantly (49 +/- 17 cm. water). Comparison of the operative and postoperative urodynamic characteristics of bladder filling shows that radical prostatectomy produced no significant change in the filling characteristics of the bladder in terms of bladder capacity, or volume at which sensations of fullness or urgency are reported. Voiding pressure-flow studies show a significant increase in maximum flow rate (8 +/- 1 to 13 +/- 2 ml., per second, p = 0.007), and significant decreases in maximum detrusor pressure (61 +/- 5.4 to 39 +/- 4 cm. water, p = 0.002), urethral opening pressure (45 +/- 7 to 25 +/- 4 cm. water, p = 0.004) and residual volume (150 +/- 37 to 62 +/- 43 ml., p = 0.019). Urethral profile measurements show that there was no significant change in either the maximum urethral closure pressure (94 +/- 9 to 83 +/- 9 cm. water) or external sphincter length (3.6 +/- 0.8 to 3.2 +/- 0.8 cm.). Preoperatively, the bladder neck pressures were 25 +/- 4.4 cm. water and were abolished after prostatectomy, indicating that the decrease in obstructive characteristics is due to removal of the prostate.

PMID:
1383575
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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