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Hum Pathol. 1992 Sep;23(9):1004-10.

Characterization of HeLa cell vacuoles induced by Helicobacter pylori broth culture supernatant.

Author information

1
Infectious Diseases Section, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Nashville, TN.

Abstract

Helicobacter pylori broth culture supernatants induce eukaryotic cell vacuolation in vitro, a phenomenon that has been attributed to cytotoxic activity. We sought to characterize further the vacuolation of HeLa cells that occurs in response to H pylori culture supernatant. Nascent vacuoles were detectable by electron microscopy after 90 minutes of incubation with H pylori supernatant and were not associated with any identifiable organelle. After 6 days of incubation with H pylori supernatant, vacuoles were membrane-bound structures filled with electron-dense debris, which resembled secondary lysosomes. Acid phosphatase activity was detected within the vacuoles. The vacuoles induced by H pylori supernatant were then compared with vacuoles induced by trimethylamine, a weak base known to induce lysosomal swelling. Neutral red dye rapidly entered the vacuoles induced by either H pylori supernatant or trimethylamine, and both types of vacuoles were reversible. Compared with trimethylamine-induced vacuoles, the vacuoles induced by H pylori supernatant were larger and typically lacked a limiting membrane. In the early stages of formation, vacuoles induced by trimethylamine were labeled by lucifer yellow, a pinocytotic marker, whereas H pylori cytotoxin-induced vacuoles were not. These data suggest that trimethylamine-induced vacuoles arise directly from endocytic compartments, whereas H pylori cytotoxin induces vacuole formation via an autophagic mechanism.

PMID:
1381332
DOI:
10.1016/0046-8177(92)90261-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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