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J Cardiovasc Pharmacol. 1992 Feb;19(2):222-32.

Spare receptors for beta-adrenoceptor-mediated positive inotropic effects of catecholamines in the human heart.

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1
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Essen, F.R.G.

Abstract

We studied whether the human heart has spare receptors for beta-adrenoceptor-mediated positive inotropic effects. Thus, we assessed in right atria and left papillary muscles of patients with different degrees of heart failure under identical experimental conditions affinity (pKI values from (-)-[125I]iodocyanopindolol binding) and potency (pD2 values from contractile responses) for isoprenaline, adrenaline, and noradrenaline in comparison with rat heart. Plots of beta-adrenoceptor occupancy versus responses constructed from these data revealed that rat left atria and papillary muscles had a large receptor reserve for all three beta-adrenoceptor agonists: 50% of maximal response was produced with only 1-3% of beta-adrenoceptor occupancy. In human heart, however, receptor reserve was considerably lower: 50% of maximal response required 8-10% (in right atria) and 20-25% (in left papillary muscles) occupation of beta-adrenoceptors. Receptor reserve declined further with an increasing degree of heart failure (and decreasing beta-adrenoceptor number): in end-stage heart failure (New York Heart Association class IV) both in right atria and left papillary muscles a 1:1 ratio between beta-adrenoceptor occupancy and responses was observed. These data show that the human heart has only a small receptor reserve for beta-adrenoceptor agonists. This may explain why a decrease in beta-adrenoceptor number leads to a decrease in beta-adrenoceptor function early in the development of heart failure.

PMID:
1376792
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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