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Mutat Res. 1992 Apr;271(2):101-13.

High-dose combination alkylating agents with autologous bone-marrow support in patients with breast cancer: preliminary assessment of DNA damage in individual peripheral blood lymphocytes using the single cell gel electrophoresis assay.

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1
Integrated Laboratory Systems, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709.

Abstract

The single cell gel (SCG) assay is a sensitive electrophoretic technique for detecting the presence of DNA single strand breaks and alkali-labile damage in individual cells. This technique was used to evaluate the levels of DNA damage in cryopreserved peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) from 11 breast cancer patients treated with high doses of cyclophosphamide and cisplatin and provided autologous bone marrow transplantation after treatment. PBL specimens for the SCG study were obtained just prior to treatment, following the administration of cyclophosphamide and cisplatin for 2 days, and upon lymphocytic recovery. Based on a concurrent analysis of DNA damage in cryopreserved and non-cryopreserved PBL samples from three patients, the mean level of DNA migration or the dispersion of damage among cells was not affected by the process of cryopreservation. The pre-treatment samples of several patients contained PBL with increased levels of DNA damage, presumably reflecting persistent DNA damage induced by previous treatment regimens. Chemotherapy resulted in a significant but variable increase in DNA damage in PBL samples from all patients. In this limited study, the level of damage did not correlate with serum levels of cyclophosphamide or with lymphocyte toxicity. Among the post-treatment samples, increased levels of DNA damage were absent in most but not all patients. The presence of damaged cells in the post-treatment samples may be indicative of an inadequate therapy regimen or of DNA damage resulting from non-therapy related processes. Because of its simplicity and short processing time, the SCG assay can be used to evaluate levels of DNA damage during the course of therapy, allowing the dose schedule to be altered to achieve a desired effect level.

PMID:
1372680
DOI:
10.1016/0165-1161(92)91083-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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