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Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2004 Feb;171(4):405-12. Epub 2003 Sep 10.

Acute effects of gabapentin on laboratory measures of aggressive and escape responses of adult parolees with and without a history of conduct disorder.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, Human Psychopharmacology Laboratory, University of Texas-Houston Health Science Center, 1300 Moursund Street, Houston, TX 77030-3497, USA. don.r.cherek@uth.tmc.edu

Abstract

RATIONALE:

The possible role of GABA in human aggression was evaluated by administering gabapentin to subjects with and without a history of conduct disorder and comparing the effects on laboratory measures of aggression and escape.

METHODS:

Eighteen male and two female subjects with a history of criminal behavior participated in experimental sessions, which measured aggressive and escape responses. Ten subjects had a history of childhood conduct disorder (CD+) and ten subjects with no history (non-CD controls). Aggression was measured using the Point Subtraction Aggression Paradigm (PSAP), which provided subjects aggressive, escape and monetary reinforced response options.

RESULTS:

Acute doses (200, 400 and 800 mg) of gabapentin had similar effects on aggressive responses among CD+ subjects compared to non-CD control subjects. Aggressive responses of CD+ and non-CD control subjects increased at lower gabapentin doses, and decreased at the highest 800 mg gabapentin dose. Gabapentin increased escape responses for both CD+ and non-CD controls CD- subjects at the lowest dose, but then produced dose-related decreases at the two higher doses in both groups. No changes in monetary reinforced responses were observed, indicative of no CNS stimulation or sedation.

CONCLUSIONS:

Gabapentin produced similar bitonic effects upon aggressive and escape responses in subjects with and without a history of childhood conduct disorder. This is in marked contrast to prior differential effects of baclofen on aggressive responses between CD+ and non-CD control subjects in a previous study.

PMID:
13680071
DOI:
10.1007/s00213-003-1590-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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