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Curr Biol. 2003 Sep 16;13(18):1583-95.

Elg1 forms an alternative PCNA-interacting RFC complex required to maintain genome stability.

Author information

1
Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, 600 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X5, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Genome instability is a hallmark of cancer and plays a critical role in generating the myriad of phenotypes selected for during tumor progression. However, the mechanisms that prevent genome rearrangements remain poorly understood.

RESULTS:

To elucidate the mechanisms that ensure genome stability, we screened a collection of candidate genes for suppressors of gross chromosomal rearrangements (GCRs) in budding yeast. One potent suppressor gene encodes Elg1, a conserved but uncharacterized homolog of the large RFC subunit Rfc1 and the alternative RFC subunits Ctf18/Chl12 and Rad24. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that Elg1 forms a novel and distinct RFC-like complex in both yeast and human cells. We find that Elg1 is required for efficient S phase progression and telomere homeostasis in yeast. Elg1 interacts physically with the PCNA homolog Pol30 and the FEN-1 homolog Rad27. The physical and genetic interactions suggest a role for Elg1 in Okazaki fragment maturation. Furthermore, Elg1 acts in concert with the alternative Rfc1-like proteins Rad24 and Ctf18 to enable Rad53 checkpoint kinase activation in response to replication stress.

CONCLUSIONS:

Collectively, these results reveal that Elg1 forms a novel and conserved alternative RFC complex. Furthermore, we propose that genome instability arises at high frequency in elg1 mutants due to a defect in Okazaki fragment maturation.

PMID:
13678589
DOI:
10.1016/s0960-9822(03)00578-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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