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AIDS. 1992 Oct;6(10):1159-64.

AIDS-defining diseases in 250 HIV-infected patients; a comparative study of clinical and autopsy diagnoses.

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1
Clinic of Infectious Diseases, L. Sacco Hospital, University of Milan, Italy.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the correlation between clinical and autopsy findings in 250 AIDS patients.

METHODS:

Clinical and autopsy diagnoses of AIDS-defining diseases in 250 AIDS patients who died in Milan between May 1984 and February 1991 were compared.

RESULTS:

Pneumocystis carinii (PCP) and oesophageal candidiasis were the most frequent clinical diagnoses, while cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection was observed in almost half of the autopsies. Forty-seven per cent of the diseases found at autopsy had not been diagnosed during life; CMV infection, mycoses, HIV-specific brain lesions, cerebral lymphomas and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) had a higher rate of non-diagnosis in life. CMV visceral infection accounted for the majority of the diseases not recognized in life. In contrast, clinically diagnosed PCP, oesophageal candidiasis and, to a lesser degree, brain toxoplasmosis were often not found at autopsy, possibly indicating a significant rate of recovery and prevention of relapse. Finally, bacterial pneumonia and sepsis, although not AIDS indicator diseases, were observed in approximately one-third of the autopsies.

CONCLUSION:

Considerable differences in the frequency and type of the AIDS-defining diseases diagnosed during life and at post mortem were found.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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