Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Cardiol. 1992 Nov 15;70(15):1287-91.

Effects of guava intake on serum total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and on systemic blood pressure.

Author information

1
Heart Research Laboratory, Medical Hospital and Research Centre, Moradabad, India.

Abstract

There is evidence that inclusion of high fiber foods such as oats, fruits and vegetables in the diet can decrease fat intake and modulate blood lipids. To test this hypothesis, 61 group A and 59 group B patients with essential hypertension were administered guava fruit preferably before meals in a foods-to-eat approach rather than foods-to-restrict, in a randomized and single-blind fashion for 12 weeks. At entry into the study, mean age, male sex, mean body mass index, percentages of risk factors and mean levels of blood lipids were comparable between groups A and B. Adherence to guava consumption was assessed by questionnaires and weighing of guava intake by 24-hour recall after 12 weeks of follow-up. Nutrient intakes including saturated and total fat were significantly decreased; carbohydrates, total and soluble fiber and vitamins and mineral intakes were significantly higher in group A than in group B at 12 weeks. There was a significant net decrease in serum total cholesterol (9.9%), triglycerides (7.7%) and blood pressures (9.0/8.0 mm Hg) with a significant net increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (8.0%) after 12 weeks of guava fruit substitution in group A than in group B. By adding moderate amounts of guava fruit in the usual diet, changes in dietary fatty acids and carbohydrates may occur, providing significant amounts of soluble dietary fiber and antioxidant vitamins and minerals without any adverse effects. There is a greater decrease in lipoprotein metabolism and blood pressures.

PMID:
1332463
DOI:
10.1016/0002-9149(92)90763-o
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center