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J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2003 Sep;37(3):273-80.

rRNA probes used to quantify the effects of glycomacropeptide and alpha-lactalbumin supplementation on the predominant groups of intestinal bacteria of infant rhesus monkeys challenged with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli.

Author information

1
Food Microbial Sciences Unit, School of Food Biosciences, The University of Reading, Reading, RG6 6AP, UK. w.m.bruck@reading.ac.uk

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Certain milk factors may help to promote the growth of a host-friendly colonic microflora (e.g. bifidobacteria, lactobacilli) and explain why breast-fed infants experience fewer and milder intestinal infections than those who are formula-fed. The effects of supplementation of formula with two such milk factors was investigated in this study.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Infant rhesus macaques were breast-fed, fed control formula, or formula supplemented with glycomacropeptide (GMP) or alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-LA) from birth to 5 months of age. Blood was drawn monthly and rectal swabs were collected weekly. At 4.5 months of age, 10(8) colony-forming units of enteropathogenic E.coli O127, strain 2349/68 (EPEC) was given orally and the response to infection assessed. The bacteriology of rectal swabs pre- and post-infection was determined by culture independent fluorescence in situ hybridization.

RESULTS:

Post-challenge, breast-fed infants and infants fed alpha-LA-supplemented formula had no diarrhea, whilst those infants fed GMP-supplemented formula had intermittent diarrhea. In infants fed control formula the diarrhea was acute.

CONCLUSIONS:

Supplementation of infant formula with appropriate milk proteins may be useful for improving the infant's ability to resist acute infection caused by E.coli.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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