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Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2003 Aug 15;18(4):433-42.

Essential fatty acid status in paediatric Crohn's disease: relationship with disease activity and nutritional status.

Author information

1
Institute of Human Nutrition, School of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK. tt2@soton.ac.uk

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Active paediatric Crohn's disease is associated with nutritional deficiencies and altered nutrient intake. The availability of essential fatty acids (linoleic and alpha-linolenic acids) or their derivatives (arachidonic and eicosapentaenoic acids) may alter in plasma and cell membrane phospholipid in protein-energy malnutrition in children and in Crohn's disease in adults.

AIM:

To investigate the relationship of fatty acid phospholipid profiles with disease activity and nutritional status in paediatric Crohn's disease.

METHODS:

The fatty acid (proportionate) composition of plasma and erythrocyte phosphatidylcholine was determined in 30 patients (10.3-17.0 years) stratified into active and quiescent Crohn's disease (paediatric Crohn's disease activity index) and high and low body mass (body mass index centile).

RESULTS:

In plasma phosphatidylcholine, active disease activity was associated with a lower level of alpha-linolenic acid compared with that in quiescent disease (P < 0.05). A body mass index below the 50th centile was associated with active Crohn's disease, low linoleic and alpha-linolenic acids and high arachidonic acid (P < 0.05) in plasma phosphatidylcholine, and low alpha-linolenic acid in erythrocyte phosphatidylcholine. These findings could not be explained through differences in habitual dietary fat intake.

CONCLUSION:

In paediatric Crohn's disease, a low body mass index centile and high disease activity are associated with altered profiles of essential fatty acids and their derivatives, which may reflect altered metabolic demand.

PMID:
12940929
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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