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Issues Compr Pediatr Nurs. 2003 Jul-Sep;26(3):159-81.

Self-reported health care self-care needs of transition-age youth: a pilot study.

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1
USC UAP at Childrens Hospital, Los Angeles, California 90033, USA. cbetz@usc.edu

Erratum in

  • Issues Compr Pediatr Nurs. 2004 Jan-Mar;27(1):63.

Abstract

The purpose of this pilot study was to describe the self-reported health care self-care needs and skills of transition-aged youth referred for transition services. Data were obtained from California Healthy and Ready to Work Transition Assessment Tool through a retrospective chart review. Yes, no, and with assistance responses were rank ordered according to the sample and subgroupings of youth. Of the items, 30% were answered affirmatively by 80% or more of respondents. Nearly 20% of the items were answered as "no" by respondents. A few items were answered "with assistance" by less than 30% of respondents. Data were rank ordered according to diagnostic group. The cancer group (n=8) reported 100% "yes" responses to 12 items, compared with 2 for the developmental disabilities group (n=7) and none for the "other" group (n=10). Eight of the domains had Kuder-Richardson levels >0.60 [correction]. Spearman nonparametric correlation analyses were conducted among individual questions of the six domains with low Kuder-Richardson levels (<0.60) for further analysis and to assess the problem items. Findings revealed youth with developmental disabilities had significantly higher numbers of "no" responses in nine domains than youth with cancer [correction]. Groups were compared using domain-specific summary scores of youth with cancer diagnoses with those of youth with developmental disabilities to examine differences in level of skills. Findings revealed youth with developmental disabilities had significantly higher numbers of "no" responses in seven domains than youth with cancer. Findings revealed youth with cancer had significantly higher numbers of "yes" responses in six domains than youth with developmental disabilities. Research and clinical implications are discussed.

PMID:
12936699
DOI:
10.1080/01460860390223880
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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