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J Bone Miner Res. 2003 Aug;18(8):1478-85.

Direct suppressive effect of acute metabolic and respiratory alkalosis on parathyroid hormone secretion in the dog.

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1
Departamento de Medicina y Cirugía Animal, Universidad de Córdoba, Córdoba, Spain.

Abstract

Acute alkalosis may directly affect PTH secretion. The effect of acute metabolic and respiratory alkalosis was studied in 20 dogs. PTH values were lower in the metabolic (5.6 +/- 0.8 pg/ml) and respiratory (1.8 +/- 0.6 pg/ml) alkalosis groups than in the control group (27 +/- 5 pg/ml). Acute alkalosis is an independent factor that decreases PTH values during normocalcemia and delays the PTH response to hypocalcemia.

INTRODUCTION:

We recently showed that acute metabolic and respiratory acidosis stimulated PTH secretion. This study was designed to evaluate whether acute metabolic and respiratory alkalosis suppressed parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Three groups of 10 dogs were studied: control, acute metabolic alkalosis, and acute respiratory alkalosis. Metabolic alkalosis was induced with an infusion of sodium bicarbonate and respiratory alkalosis by hyperventilation. Calcium chloride was infused to prevent alkalosis-induced hypocalcemia during the first 60 minutes. During the next 30 minutes, disodium EDTA was infused to induce hypocalcemia and to evaluate the PTH response to hypocalcemia. Because the infusion of sodium bicarbonate resulted in hypernatremia, the effect of hypernatremia was studied in an additional group that received hypertonic saline.

RESULTS:

After 60 minutes of a normocalcemic clamp, PTH values were less (p < 0.05) in the metabolic (5.6 +/- 0.8 pg/ml) and respiratory (1.8 +/- 0.6 pg/ml) alkalosis groups than in the control group (27 +/- 5 pg/ml); the respective blood pH values were 7.61 +/- 0.01, 7.59 +/- 0.02, and 7.39 +/- 0.02. The maximal PTH response to hypocalcemia was similar among the three groups. However, the maximal PTH response was observed after a decrease in ionized calcium of 0.20 mM in the control group but not until a decrease of 0.40 mM in the metabolic and respiratory alkalosis groups. In contrast to the metabolic alkalosis group, hypernatremia (157 +/- 2 mEq/liter) in the hypertonic saline group was associated with an increased PTH value (46 +/- 4 pg/ml). Finally, the half-life of intact PTH was not different among the control and two alkalosis groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Acute metabolic and respiratory alkalosis markedly decreased PTH values during normocalcemia and delayed the PTH response to hypocalcemia. Whether acute metabolic and respiratory alkalosis affect PTH and calcium metabolism in such settings as the postprandial alkaline tide (metabolic alkalosis) and acute sepsis (respiratory alkalosis) deserves to be evaluated in future studies.

PMID:
12929937
DOI:
10.1359/jbmr.2003.18.8.1478
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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