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Kidney Int. 2003 Sep;64(3):906-13.

Mast cell infiltration and chemokine expression in progressive renal disease.

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1
University of Melbourne, Department of Medicine, St. Vincent's Hospital, Fitzroy, Victoria, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Mast cells are growth factor-rich, bone marrow-derived cells that infiltrate injured tissue where they have been implicated in the pathogenesis of progressive fibrosis.

METHODS:

Mast cell infiltration and the expression of related chemoattractants was examined following 5/6 nephrectomy, a model of progressive, nonimmune-mediated renal injury. In addition, expression of the profibrotic cytokine, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) within mast cells and the effects of renoprotective therapy with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition were also determined.

RESULTS:

Renal injury was accompanied by mast cell infiltration, in close proximity to areas of tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Mast cells displayed toluidine blue metachromasia and were immunopositive for TGF-beta1 as well as chymase and tryptase. The expression of several mast cell chemokines, including stem cell factor, interleukin-8 (IL-8), and also TGF-beta1, were increased in 5/6 nephrectomized kidneys. ACE inhibition with ramipril led to a reduction in renal injury in association with attenuation of mast cell infiltration and chemokine expression.

CONCLUSION:

Mast cell infiltration and related chemokine expression are prominent and early features following renal mass reduction and may contribute pathogenetically to progressive renal injury.

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