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Chest. 2003 Aug;124(2):633-8.

Nitric oxide metabolites are not reduced in exhaled breath condensate of patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia.

Author information

1
Department of Thoracic Medicine, Imperial College School of Medicine, National Heart and Lung Institute, London, UK.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES:

To investigate whether nitric oxide (NO) metabolites would be reduced in children affected by primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD).

DESIGN:

Single-center observational study.

PATIENTS:

Fifteen children with PCD (seven boys; mean [+/- SEM] age, 10.3 +/- 0.7 years; mean FEV(1), 73 +/- 2.1% predicted) were recruited along with 14 healthy age-matched subjects (seven boys; mean age, 11.5 +/- 0.4 years; mean FEV(1), 103 +/- 5% predicted).

INTERVENTIONS:

We assessed the levels of nitrite (NO(2)(-)), NO(2)(-)/NO(3)(-) (NO(2)(-)/NO(3)(-)), and S-nitrosothiol in exhaled breath condensate, exhaled NO, and nasal NO from children with PCD compared to those in healthy children.

MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS:

The mean exhaled and nasal NO levels were markedly decreased in children with PCD compared to those without PCD (3.2 +/- 0.2 vs 8.5 +/- 0.9 parts per billion [ppb], respectively [p < 0.0001]; 59.6 +/- 12.2 vs 505.5 +/- 66.8 ppb, respectively [p < 0.001]). Despite the lower levels of exhaled NO in children with PCD, no differences were found in the mean levels of NO(2)(-) (2.9 +/- 0.4 vs 3.5 +/- 0.3 microM, respectively), NO(2)(-)/NO(3)(-) (35.2 +/- 5.0 vs 34.3 +/- 4.5 microM, respectively), or S-nitrosothiol (1.0 +/- 0.2 vs 0.6 +/- 0.1 microM, respectively) between children with PCD and healthy subjects.

CONCLUSION:

These findings suggest that NO synthase activity may not be decreased as much as might be expected on the basis of low exhaled and nasal NO levels.

PMID:
12907553
DOI:
10.1378/chest.124.2.633
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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