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Chest. 2003 Aug;124(2):602-7.

Respiratory monitoring by means of an unattended device in children with suspected uncomplicated obstructive sleep apnea: a validation study.

Author information

1
Sleep Disorders Center, Department of Neurology, and Statistic Unit, IRCCS H San Raffaele, Milan, Italy. zucconi.marco@hsr.it

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVE:

To compare an unattended device for cardiorespiratory monitoring (POLY-MESAM; MAP; Martinsried, Germany) [P-M] with classic nocturnal polysomnography (PSG) for diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children.

DESIGN:

Clinical setting.

PATIENTS:

Twelve children (age range, 3 to 6 years) with highly suspected uncomplicated OSA who underwent PSG and P-M on 2 consecutive laboratory nights in a balanced manner.

MEASUREMENTS:

Respiratory indexes were compared for P-M (automated analysis), hand-scored revised P-M (P-Mrev), and PSG. Analysis of contingency for cutoff levels of respiratory disturbance index (RDI) of 5 and 10 and level of agreement between P-M, P-Mrev, and PSG by the concordance method were evaluated.

RESULTS:

Nine of twelve children (75%) had a PSG RDI > 5, while 41.7% had an RDI > 10, indicating moderate-to-severe OSA. P-M sensitivity (78%) increased with the increase of the RDI cutoff, and P-Mrev sensitivity reached 100% at the cutoff of 10. The specificity was low for RDI > 5 and increased only modestly at RDI > 10 (P-Mrev, 57%). Seven of 12 children (increasing to 9 children with P-Mrev) and 9 of 12 children (increasing to 11 children with P-Mrev) were correctly classified by the P-M unit when cutoffs of 5 and 10 were considered, respectively. As far as the agreement level is concerned, P-M underestimated the incidence of obstructive hypopnea and overestimated the number of central apnea cases. P-Mrev improved the latter measure.

CONCLUSION:

Based on these data, the P-M device cannot be advocated for common use in a clinical setting, but it may have a role in urgent screening for highly suspected moderate-to-severe OSA.

PMID:
12907549
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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