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Chest. 2003 Aug;124(2):594-601.

Left ventricular hypertrophy is a common echocardiographic abnormality in severe obstructive sleep apnea and reverses with nasal continuous positive airway pressure.

Author information

1
Intermountain Sleep Disorders Center, LDS Hospital, Salt Lake City, Utah 84143, USA. ldtclowa@ihc.com

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES:

To determine cardiac structural abnormalities by echocardiography in subjects with severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and to determine the long-term effects of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on such abnormalities.

DESIGN:

Polysomnography was conducted on oximetry-screened patients who showed a desaturation index > 40/h and > or = 20% cumulative time spent below 90%. From these, 25 patients with severe OSA but without daytime hypoxemia underwent echocardiography prior to, then 1 month and 6 months following initiation of CPAP treatment.

SETTING:

Outpatient sleep disorders center.

RESULTS:

Of the 25 patients, 13 patients (52%) had hypertension by history or on physical examination. Baseline echocardiograms showed that severe OSA was associated with numerous cardiovascular abnormalities, including left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) [88%], left atrial enlargement (LAE) [64%], right atrial enlargement (RAE) [48%], and right ventricular hypertrophy (16%). In all patients (intent to treat) as well as those patients compliant with CPAP therapy (84% > 3 h nightly), there was a significant reduction in LVH after 6 months of CPAP therapy as measured by interventricular septal distance (baseline diastolic mean, 13.0 mm; 6-month mean after CPAP, 12.3 mm; p < 0.02). RAE and LAE were unchanged after CPAP therapy.

CONCLUSIONS:

LVH was present in high frequency in subjects with severe OSA and regressed after 6 months of nasal CPAP therapy.

PMID:
12907548
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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