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Chest. 2003 Aug;124(2):587-93.

Snoring in preschool children: prevalence and association with nocturnal cough and asthma.

Author information

1
David Read Laboratory, Department of Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney, Westmead, NSW, Australia.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The association between snoring, nocturnal cough, and allergic symptoms in young children is not known.

OBJECTIVE:

To measure the prevalence of habitual snoring and its association with nocturnal cough, asthma, and hay fever in preschool children.

SETTING:

A cross-sectional study.

SUBJECTS:

Preschool children aged 2 to 5 years.

METHOD:

The data were collected in a cross-sectional study. A total of 974 children were randomly selected from two areas of Lismore and Wagga Wagga in New South Wales, Australia.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of snoring was 10.5%, with no gender difference (p = 0.99) or trend association with age (p = 0.58). The association between snoring and nocturnal cough was highly significant (odds ratio [OR], 3.68; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.41 to 5.63; p = 0.001). This association was significant in both the nonasthmatic and asthmatic groups when examined separately. Snoring was also significantly associated with asthma (OR, 2.03; 95% CI, 1.34 to 3.10; p = 0.001). In subjects without hay fever, the association between snoring and asthma was also highly significant (41.2% vs 24.8%; OR, 2.12; 95% CI, 1.34 to 3.37; p = 0.001).

CONCLUSION:

The prevalence of snoring in preschool children was 10.5% for both genders. Snoring was significantly associated with both nocturnal cough and asthma. Because snoring, asthma, and nocturnal cough may have a common etiology, it is possible that effective treatment of one symptom may lead to reductions in the presence or severity of the other symptoms.

PMID:
12907547
DOI:
10.1378/chest.124.2.587
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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