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Tumori. 2003 Jul-Aug;89(4 Suppl):301-4.

[Early de novo neoplasia after renal transplantation].

[Article in Italian]

Author information

1
Dipartimento di Scienze Chirurgiche, Trapianti d'Organo e Tecnologie Avanzate, Centro Trapianti d'Organo, Azienda Policlinico, Università degli Studi di Catania.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The chronic use of immunosuppressive therapy in transplant recipients to prevent acute rejection increases the long-term risk of cancer. The overall incidence of de novo malignancies (DNM) after kidney transplantation ranges from 6% to 11%.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Between January 2000 and December 2002, 135 renal and 3 combined kidney-pancreas transplantations were performed.

RESULTS:

Of 138 solid organ transplant recipients, a total of 16 (11.6%) cancers were diagnosed in 10 renal transplant recipients (7.2%). Six patients were male and three female, with a mean age of 47 years (range, 19-63, years). Tumor presented at a mean time of 14 months (range, 2-24, months) after transplantation. There were three patients with skin cancers, three with Kaposis's sarcoma, one with renal cell cancer, one with bladder carcinoma and one with breast cancer.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although the DNM occurs more frequently many years after a kidney transplantation, our experience demonstrated that they can occur early in the follow-up. Skin malignancies had the best prognosis, probably because of early detection and treatment. Kaposi's sarcoma benefits from reduction or cessation of immuno-suppression, but there is a higher risk of graft loss. Solid organ de novo malignancies are often more aggressive than in normal population, and the life expectancy of these recipients is very low. Careful long-term screening protocols are needed for detection of such malignancies in an early stage.

PMID:
12903627
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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