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J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2003 Jul-Aug;26(6):352-5.

Lateral cervical curve changes in patients receiving chiropractic care after a motor vehicle collision: a retrospective case series.

Author information

1
Adjunct Research Faculty, Life Chiropractic College West, Othello, Wash, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine radiological changes of the lateral cervical curve in patients who received chiropractic care after motor vehicle collisions.

DESIGN:

A retrospective case series. Thirteen patients who had received chiropractic care after motor vehicle collisions were selected from a northeastern Washington chiropractic office. Patients had a lateral cervical radiograph taken prior to the initiation of chiropractic treatment and a comparative lateral cervical radiograph subsequent to a period of care. Cases were included if they met the previously stated criteria and if the radiographs were of sufficient quality to determine the lateral cervical curve from C2-C7.

RESULTS:

Adjustments rendered using an Activator Adjusting Instrument. Eleven of the subjects were also instructed to perform stretching exercises. Compared to the initial lateral cervical radiograph, the comparative radiographs demonstrated a mean increase in cervical lordosis between C2 and C7 of 6.4 degrees (SD = 8.2). The standard error estimate of the population was 2.3 degrees, with a 95% confidence interval of 1.4 degrees to 11.4 degrees.

CONCLUSION:

There was a mean increase in the cervical lordosis of 6.4 degrees (SD = 8.2). The standard error estimate of the population was 2.3 degrees, with a 95% confidence interval of 1.4 degrees to 11.4 degrees. We were not able to determine the individual effects of adjustment, stretching, and natural progression of the condition. The results suggest that further study of this phenomenon should be undertaken.

PMID:
12902963
DOI:
10.1016/S0161-4754(03)00069-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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