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Dent Mater. 2003 Nov;19(7):612-9.

Color stability and hardness in dental composites after accelerated aging.

Author information

1
Department of Preventive and Restorative Dental Sciences, Division of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, University of California San Francisco, 707 Parnassus Avenue, Box 0758, San Francisco, CA 94143-0758, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To investigate the color and microhardness changes of five chemically- and five light-curing composites as a function of accelerated aging from light exposure.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

From each material five composite specimens were embedded in epoxy resin prior to determining the Knoop microhardness of the surface. For analyzing the color DeltaE*=f((L*a*b*)) with a spectrophotometer, three discs per composite were prepared. After measuring the baseline for hardness and color the same specimens were exposed to a xenon arc light and water in a Weather-Ometer machine for a total radiant energy of 150 kJ/m2 and 122 h. The microhardness and the color were again determined following the aging treatment.

RESULTS:

Each material showed a significant increase in hardness after aging treatment (p<0.05). Comparing the hardness changes (in %) of the light-cured materials with the chemically cured materials, no significant difference could be found. Perceptible color differences could be observed for all the materials. Three brands showed small differences with DeltaE*=1.6-2.2, while four composites had DeltaE* ranging from 6.2 to 15.5. A significant correlation between hardness values and color changes could not be established.

CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE:

The findings suggest that, since light-curable materials showed significantly more resistance to color changes after accelerated aging by light and water than chemically-cured materials, they may be more esthetically acceptable. Color changes were not correlated with surface hardness changes of the materials after aging.

PMID:
12901985
DOI:
10.1016/s0109-5641(03)00003-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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