Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Int J Eat Disord. 2003 Sep;34(2):251-4.

Are adolescents harmed when asked risky weight control behavior and attitude questions? Implications for consent procedures.

Author information

1
San Diego State University, University of California, San Diego Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology, USA. btaylor@stanford.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study explores whether asking minors about risky weight control behaviors and attitudes increases the frequency of those behaviors and attitudes.

METHODS:

Participants were 115 sixth-grade girls who responded to questions on risky weight control behaviors and attitudes at baseline and at 12-month follow-up. An additional 107 girls, who had not been part of the baseline, provided data only at follow-up. The two groups were compared on risky weight control behaviors and attitudes at follow-up using chi-square analyses, Mann-Whitney U tests, Cohen's effect sizes, and odds ratios.

RESULTS:

No evidence of a negative effect in the twice-assessed group was found. All rates decreased from baseline to follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS:

There is only minimal risk and perhaps even some benefit of asking questions about risky weight control behaviors and attitudes. Implications for determining appropriate consent procedures are discussed.

PMID:
12898562
DOI:
10.1002/eat.10188
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center